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On The Table Read Magazine, “the best book magazine in the UK“, Adrián Gordaliza Vega talks about the inspiration behind his new book, The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition.


the best creativity magazine in the UK, the best book magazine in the UK, the best arts magazine in the UK, the best entertainment magazine in the UK, the best celebrity magazine in the UK, book marketing UK, book promotion UK, music marketing UK, music promotion UK, film marketing UK, film promotion UK, arts and entertainment magazine, online magazine uk, creativity magazineWritten by JJ Barnes

www.jjbarnes.co.uk

I interviewed Adrián Gordaliza Vega about his life and career, what inspired him to write about the changes our society is going though in his new book, The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition, and his research process.

Tell me a bit about who you are.

Adrián Gordaliza Vega on The Table Read Magazine
Adrián Gordaliza Vega

My name is Adrián Gordaliza Vega and for the last 17 years I have been living in the UK. My story is a classic London melting pot tale. I was born in Spain, my wife is Portuguese with a Cape Verdean background, and my 6-year-old daughter is a true Londoner, rocking three languages already. I wear multiple hats as an author and a language tutor, running my own companies, Premium Languages and Spencer-Vega Languages.

When did you first WANT to write a book?

Ever since I was a teenager I was an avid reader. I was also a sporty young man but there were times when the only thing I wanted to do was to stay at home and read in bed. It was only natural that at some point I wanted to write a book myself.

When did you take a step to start writing?

My first serious attempt at writing a book was after I finished university. At that time I was living in Granada (Southern Spain) and the weather was always good. I wrote a lot outside.  I remember spending many hours filling-up notebooks while trying to convince myself that I was a writer.  In the end, I finished what I thought could be a novel, but I was very young and naive. It probably wasn’t longer than 25,000 words (approximately 60 pages).

How long did it take you to complete your first book from the first idea to release?

The first books that I published were destined for students of foreign languages. Those books did not take a long time to write but the experience of writing them served me well for the future. Writing involves a steep learning curve, however, the more you write the easier it gets.

How long did it take you to complete your latest book from the first idea to release?

My most-recently published book, The End of Everything: A society in transition is very different from my other books. It has been written for the general public and it is a quite ambitious attempt at describing contemporary societies in the Western world and how things changed drawing comparisons with the past. I try to find an explanation for the rise in populism and post-truth, the popularity of non-binary gender, vegan diets, climate anxiety, new forms of relationships, etc. There was a lot of research involved and it took me three long years to finish it.

Focusing on your latest release. What made you want to write The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition?

I was fascinated by the idea that every happening has a rational explanation, at least to some extent. So, I set out to unravel the logic behind the societal changes we’ve been witnessing. From the enigmatic world of contemporary art to teenagers embracing non-binary gender identities, from the divisive political landscape to the evolving dynamics of modern relationships – I wanted to make sense of it all. Writing this book helped me realise that these changes aren’t just random fads; they have a rational basis, whether we agree with them or not.

What were your biggest challenges with writing The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition?

There were quite a few challenges along the way. The main one was striking the right balance between informative content and keeping readers entertained. I didn’t want to end up with a boring book that nobody would bother reading.

What was your research process for The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition?

I think we are very lucky nowadays. Most sources can be found online and we do not need to travel to obscure libraries around the country. I do have a modest collection of reference books that came in handy though. I must admit, I absolutely enjoyed the research phase. It’s incredible how much you learn while digging into various topics. One learns so much while doing research that it is a pleasure.

How did you plan the structure of The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition?

When I began planning the structure of my book, I made a list of several topics I wanted to explore, including post-truth, democracy, art, love, sex, gender, identity, and more. Then, I approached these topics through the lens of our ‘post-modern society’. I also wanted to make each chapter as engaging as possible, so I made sure to include lively, thought-provoking introductions that provided context and grabbed the reader’s attention.

Did you get support with editing, and how much editing did The End Of Everything: A Society In Transition need?

Editing was a crucial step for me, especially since English isn’t my native language and I wrote large portions of the book in English. It was quite challenging, so I enlisted the help of not one but two editors. However, when it came to producing the Spanish edition of my book,  the translation was easy for me.

What is the first piece of writing advice you would give to anyone inspired to write a book?

Ah, this is a tricky one, but if I had to choose, I would say “keep showing up” – keep going, keep at it even on the bad days.  Maintaining motivation throughout the writing process can be challenging, especially when you’re not receiving immediate feedback. So, my advice would be to stay invested in your book and write consistently. Show up, keep putting words on the page, and trust in the process.

Can you give me a hint about any further books you’re planning to write?

Yes. My next book is a bit different.  It will still be non-fiction, but this time it will delve into the pleasures of love and the pain that arises when love remains unrequited.

And, finally, are you proud of your accomplishment? Was it worth the effort?

“Proud” might not be the exact word I’d use to describe my feelings. On one hand, I’m relieved that I completed the book, and on the other hand, I’m definitely thrilled to see it out in the world. The writing journey can be long and arduous at times, making the final moments feel somewhat anticlimactic. But was it worth it? I didn’t have an alternative; I simply had to write it. The effort I put into it and the lessons I learned along the way made it all worthwhile.

Pop all your book, website and social media links here so the readers can find you:

‘The End of Everything: A society in transition’ by Adrián Gordaliza Vega (paperback, illustrated, £12.99) was published in June 2023 by PL Press and is available through all good bookshops & internet booksellers.

Kindle: https://amzn.to/44qtZ8w

Paperback: https://amzn.to/47T7gow

Hardcover: https://amzn.to/3Z3zCIH

It is also available in Spanish.

 

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